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September 21 2014 08:05 AM

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Do you tell people that you have dyscalculia?





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just found dyscalculia
dianna20
#1 Print Post
Posted on May 23 2012 04:46 PM
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I am thrilled that I just found out about dyscalculia by accident.
I imagine most of the people on the forum are fairly young and I'm not. I just wanted to say how I wish I had know about this
condition at an early age. It explains so much.
I have always scored very high in everything but math.I still count on my fingers if I don't have a calculator. I always thought it was because of poor initial education in math.
Recently I've been playing board games that involve numbers. What a nightmare! I've started just having another glass of wine and accepting the fact that I will always be the loser. At least we're not playing for money.
I did make it through college after taking two remedial math
classes and have had a great career that involves very little math.
I used to get lost a lot when driving. Thanks to my best driving buddy GPS, all is well.
 
justfoundout
#2 Print Post
Posted on May 24 2012 12:41 AM
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5/123/12
Hi dianna20. I have to smile,... you've 'just found dyscalculia', but it found you a long time ago. Isn't it wonderful to finally have a satisfactory, logical, explanation? Welcome. - jus'
 
dianna20
#3 Print Post
Posted on May 24 2012 11:39 AM
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Thanks so much. It is wonderful to have a satisfactory explanation at last.
Can't wait until I tell my one and only child who is a
CPA why mom counts on her fingers.

The word does need to be spread.
 
justfoundout
#4 Print Post
Posted on May 24 2012 11:16 PM
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5/234/12
Yes, the word needs to be spread. Today, I called back over to the community college where I'd failed Elementary Algebra three times. The phone happened to get answered by a Disability Counselor who had listened to my story four years ago. I told her that I'm four classes away from a Bachelor's degree and she said she was very proud of me for getting this far. I think that the dyscalculia is so over-powering that we have no way to know whether we would have been 'math people' or 'word people' were it not for the dyscalculia. As it turns out, dyscalculics are 'word people', since that's what we have the best 'inventory' of. ;) - jus'
 
dianna20
#5 Print Post
Posted on May 25 2012 06:20 PM
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That has to be very frustrating.
I have been trying to do some research on dyscalculia and found your past posts and others to be very helpful. I will do what I can to spread the word and push for change.
I was able to get an Associate's degree by substituting logic for algebra but I don't know what I would have done if I had gone for Bachelor's.
I had dropped out of school at a very young age and went back as a
"mature student". That actually helped me bypass a lot of the frustrations that I would have had with math.
This condition is overwheming in that it effects so many aspects of life.
More that I probably know about at this time.
 
justfoundout
#6 Print Post
Posted on May 26 2012 06:44 PM
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5/26/12
Hi dianna20,
Thanks for the encouragement that my posts may be helping a few people. No one here can 'cover all the bases' concerning dyscalculia and what would be the 'best course' for everyone. We only know what we have experienced individually.

Dianna, that's great that you completed your Associate's degree. You got diagnosed and, based on that, were allowed to substitute logic for algebra? Here's the good news. There is a rule that, in Texas, anyone who completes an AA at a community college 'must' be allowed to transfer that AA degree 'as a block, no questions asked' to any State University. This means that, worst case scenario, you might still have to take a Statistics class to cover an additional 3 math credits. My 'other three' math credits were covered by a Computer Literacy course I'd completed at cc. Since I wasn't trying to get any kind of Computer degree, I didn't need those Computer Literacy credits for my minor nor for my major.

Yes, there are endless examples of how dyscalculia affects our lives. Even after three years of knowing about dyscalculia, I'll still be remeniscing about something that happened a long time ago, and then, I'll realise that dyscalculia could easily have been at the crux of the situation. If there's anything else that I might share with you in regard to continuing your education, please let me know. PM's are welcome. - jus'

See heading 'transfer is guaranteed'.
http://www.dcccd....fault.aspx
Edited by justfoundout on May 26 2012 06:49 PM
 
dianna20
#7 Print Post
Posted on May 26 2012 09:40 PM
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Thanks so much for the information.
I will spread the word and let others know where to find help.
I obtained my Associate's degree back in "the old days" when there was no help available. I was able to substitute logic because that was an option for everyone at the community college I attended in FL.
They also allowed any mature learner to go to college if they could pass the entrance requirements even without HS education.
That's where the remedial math came in.
I did go into a health care field where some math was required but I was able to struggle through it.
I guess I can't blame poor spelling on dyscalculia but there certainly are other skills that I'm pretty certain are affected by dyscalculia. It does make me feel a little sad that I had to go it alone but glad that there are people like you and a forum like this to help others.
I am wondering about IQ tests and other standardized testing? Are there any accommodations made for those with condition?
Thanks again, Dianna
 
justfoundout
#8 Print Post
Posted on May 26 2012 11:19 PM
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5/26/12
Yes, dianna. Nowadays taking the IQ test and getting the diagnosis seems to be the only way to get help. Teachers would be accused of partiality toward any student who they help unless that diagnosis is filed with the Disability Office and the teacher has received a letter telling them the 'accommodations' that they can give a particular student.

I'm glad that you made it into the Health care field despite 'no help'. And that you didn't even have to have a HS diploma back then is pretty amazing. One of the reasons that I never went to college when I was young was because I knew that I couldn't pass algebra. I knew that, once enrolled, my life would just be a series of reprimands for not being able to pass algebra. Back then, there wouldn't have been any recognition of a Learning Disability. I would have just been one more bright student who 'failed' and didn't finish college. The only thing now that's amusing about all this is that my recent graduation date will make me look like a 'spring chicken', at least on paper!

DARS paid for my IQ testing here in Texas. (Department of Assistive Rehabilitative Services). In North Texas there is a very good Ph D Educational Psychologist. PM me if you need his contact info. - jus'
Edited by justfoundout on May 26 2012 11:25 PM
 
RottieWoman
#9 Print Post
Posted on June 05 2012 03:09 PM
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welcome, dianna!
 
dianna20
#10 Print Post
Posted on June 05 2012 07:32 PM
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Hi Rottie Woman. Thanks so much. I read your post on the car wash and can relate to that. Very interesting.
I'm wondering about sports and dancing.
I could never play team sports well or dance with coordination but I can do very well at darts. Maybe it has to do with being able to take time rather than reacting quickly. It's the same with driving. Last time I drove on a freeway in a major city, even with GPS I took a wrong turn and thought I would never get through the place. I try to avoid driving at night and even when I was in my early 20's I had anxiety about night driving. At least now I don't feel the need to do things that I know will
be very difficult for me and concentrate on the things that I can do without too much difficulty.

Dianna
 
RottieWoman
#11 Print Post
Posted on June 05 2012 10:11 PM
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hi dianna,

I always did terribly at team sports and in middle school <7/8th grade here> got into trouble for refusing to play volleyball.
I was clumsy and un-coordinated and didn't understand the game, the directions, sides, calls or anything, was always picked last for teams amid much bullying and name-calling and so was also always very fearful at school, up til about high school. Still did badly in sports but students were more mature as it was an arts-oriented high school and teams sports or really anything besides one chosen art field at the school - was not significant. We had dance units here and there in gym and I sucked there too and was usually taken aside for assistance with either the teacher or another, better, student. In gym we also variously had a martial arts unit, a golf unit and an archery unit, all of which I did better in and since they were solitary, I could perform crappily and nobody grabbed me, screamed at me or beat me up.

I still enjoy martial arts and have taken Zumba and belly dancing and no longer care what it looks like-
 
dianna20
#12 Print Post
Posted on June 06 2012 09:34 PM
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Thanks. I feel much better knowing thats not a separate issue. You're right, there are many other fun things to do that don't involve the trauma of team sports.
I'm so sorry you were bullied. That's really terrible. I got off lucky, I was just picked last for team sports every single tme. On the positive side, I did learn empathy for others. I had an accident in elementary school that took me out of any sporting activity and gym. I was so much happier that year.
I did find as an adult that yoga, and meditation helped. Like you, I did try belly dancing and really found it fun. Haven't ried Zumba yet. Keep dancing.

Trying to spread the word.

Dianna
 
justfoundout
#13 Print Post
Posted on June 06 2012 10:16 PM
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6/6/12
I was good at volleyball, but not at basketball. Once, when there were only three students left to choose from, I begged not to be chosen for a basketball team. They choose me anyway. Since no one was 'guarding' me, my teammate threw the ball to me. I was badly 'fouled' immediately. Apparently, this is the proper term for when about 5 girls bigger than me conspire to 'maul' me out on the basketball court. I got three 'free throws',... and, of course, still missed the basket all three times. - jus'
Edited by justfoundout on June 06 2012 10:16 PM
 
dianna20
#14 Print Post
Posted on June 07 2012 12:50 PM
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I wish I'd heard these stories years ago.
It would seem to be so important for adults to help children with Dyscalculia find anything that they enjoy doing and feel reasonably confident about when participating. Maybe that could help undo some of the damage caused from these incidents.
I was going to join a line dancing group recently and then thought "are you serious". A hiking group sounds better. Less toes to step on.

Dianna

 
RottieWoman
#15 Print Post
Posted on June 07 2012 01:20 PM
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thanks, dianna. I know what you mean about empathy for others - my experiences have really helped me learn about that too.
I was in the Resource Room which was in a separate building attached to the school. They had all kinds of kids with various disabilities in there and most of them had their own lunch period, own teachers, own playground equipment, own building entrance and so on. The way it was all arranged made the whole thing very mysterious for the kids who weren't in or served by that program, so it made it very miserable for me, as kids did what they will often do in those kinds of situations. I also learned there about kids with severe autism, with CP etc, for the first time.

'jus, I'm sorry about what your teammates did. :-(
Prior to high school sports, kids literally threw all kinds of stuff at me in gym classes as well as in the halls, at lunch - I was always on the look-out for "incomings". Anything I did was fair game for notice and attack.

dianna, I hope that being able to see these stories now is helpful, I know when I first got on here, it was for me.
One thing that happened with me was, in middle school, when I was most physically threatened, my only friend there was also a student at the school - who was absent a lot of medical reasons, and who didn't do well in gym classes either. She and I were both stuck in an impromptu "special-needs" gym class arranged by that teacher, which met in the storage room adjacent to the gym. So she and I had that experience together and that did help me emotionally.
 
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