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Multiplication tables
Ceciliadlibitum
#1 Print Post
Posted on February 04 2012 10:13 AM
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This might be a helpfull thread to teachers and/or parents of children with dyscalculia.

How did you learn (or didn't you learn?) the multiplication tables?

I never knew that I had dyscalculia until I finished high school and didn't need numbers often anymore. I started to notice I was struggling with simple calculations. In primary school though, I was the queen of multiplication. I was always the quickest to answer.

How did I learn? We had a cassette at home where each table had it's own song. To me music seemed to work as a mnemonic device to remember numbers!
 
squeakymonster
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Posted on February 05 2012 06:59 AM
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I listened to the music too, but still couldn't learn my multiplication tables. I'd listen to the songs, and it has helped me learn a few of my 6s, but that's it. I know the rhythms, but not the words. My family tried games, songs, force, punishment, anything they could think of. I'd learn them for about five minutes, and forget again. I've found that knowing my 5s, 10s, some 11s, some 6s, and some 3s allow me to figure out the rest. It's not perfect, but I can manage.
I'm NOT lost, I'm just taking the scenic rout!
 
Mad_Miller20
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Posted on February 29 2012 08:55 PM
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I think that learning times tables via memorization in the form of flash cards, songs, dances, etc. is the best idea for those with dyscalculia. It allows us to use our strengths to master our weaknesses. In the long run, times tables don't matter but, children need to learn them in school. Try approaching math from a visual or verbal perspective rather then trying to force students to see the logic in the numbers because they most likely won't.
 
heathermomster
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Posted on February 29 2012 10:57 PM
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DS learned by doing the following:

1. We sat down and he looked at domino cards to verify he could subitize to 5. He can...

2. Then we practiced basic math facts, adding and subtracting to 20, using a Slavonic abacus. He knows those facts backwards and forwards.

3. Used a Singapore Mental Math grade 2 book and practiced mental math.

4. We reviewed number bonds ie, 32= 30 + 2; 104=100 + 4; 9=10-1

5. Heavily reviewed place value.

6. Practiced adding and subtracting big numbers using base 10 cubes and number lines.

7. Practiced skip counting by 2s, 5s, and 10s.

8. Ultimately used Cuisenaire rods and the area model of multiplication to review the commutative and distributive property of multiplication. DS drilled the times tables using a simple computer program nearly everyday for 10 minutes for about 2.5 months. Whenever I remember, I randomly ask him times questions. Which reminds me, he needs to practice some more....
 
Aminididi
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Posted on March 01 2012 01:44 AM
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Hahaha i had songs to help me aswell. My primary school was very musical, haha.
Hello...

Goodbye...
 
adrianbeckett
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Posted on March 09 2012 09:24 AM
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Has any tried Steve Chinn's technique of Self-voice learning where your record yourself saying the timetables. You then read them and listen at the same time. I'm not convinced flash cards, songs etc.. help. I'm looking for new techniques to help my students. can anyone recommend other things?
 
heathermomster
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Posted on March 09 2012 01:37 PM
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In 5th grade, DS used to read his history notes into a recorder and listened back as study. If an individual can't memorize by songs or music, I can't imagine the technique that you mentioned working, particularly as no underlying concept is being taught, and the study method is primarily auditory. Not everyone learns best that way, but I suppose it's worth a try.

To memorize long term,the information must make sense and be internalized. The book "How the Brain Learns Mathematics" by Sousa is extremely helpful and explains the process. Individuals with dyscalculia generally have slow processing and/or poor working memory.

The best thing to do is probably look at the individual student and figure out how they learn best. My DS is highly visual and likes manipulatives. Other individuals are not. If they don't know their addition and subtraction facts to 20, they will not know the 2s tables.

Cuisenaire rods, base 10 blocks, and area model of multiplication worked well for us. Metal math is extremely important, so they will likely need practice. See posting 4...

For extra helps with neurotypical students, some kids love Timez Attack.
http://www.bigbra...

The teacher version enables you to increase calculation time and they supply a trial version. This program did not work for us but has worked for many.
Edited by heathermomster on March 09 2012 01:42 PM
 
Ladyhawke
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Posted on March 10 2012 03:01 AM
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I "learned" my multiplication tables with flash cards my father made for me. He drilled those times tables into my head, whether I liked it or not. I still remember most of them, though I "forget" the 11 and 12 times ones sometimes and it can take me a moment or two to remember them.

I used the same method on my oldest daughter when she was learning her times tables. Fortunately, she is not Dyscalculic, so it all went well. For my second daughter I should have used the flash cards but by the time I got to the second child, I was a much more relaxed parent and for some unknown reason I did not take the time to use flash cards with her. She still learned them though, and she is not Dyscalculic either.

Ladyhawke
Algebra? When I learn decimals and fractions, you're welcome to try teaching me, but unless you have the patience of a saint and are very long-lived, good luck with that... Grin
 
RottieWoman
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Posted on March 10 2012 04:05 AM
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I remember my folks using flash cards with me. I had little to no interest and didn't understand a lot of it. I still have difficulty with some of the time tables.
 
Mad_Miller20
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Posted on March 14 2012 07:52 PM
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I think that flashcards are a really great idea. It becomes a memorization tactic. It can be helpful for children that are good at memorizing.
 
heathermomster
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Posted on March 16 2012 01:18 PM
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Flash cards are great when they work. Flash cards are generally used after the concept has been understood and ideally serve as reinforcement, not the primary method for teaching.

Many individuals with dyscalculia have poor working memory. Working memory is taxed for many daily activities. After 3 years of attempted memorization, we moved on and took a more conceptual approach. A conceptual approach benefits him with a better developed number sense and an ability to move forward and attempt higher math with better understanding.

It irritates me to no end that elementary teachers insist upon having children use rote memory to learn the times tables. Hello, do your job and learn to teach the subject. I only learned to teach the tables after exploring the subject and studying methods myself, and it took me a couple of weeks...

I can't get over this feeling that our children are being robbed of an opportunity to get help. Information about developing subitizing and better number sense are readily available. Why isn't this stuff taught on a college level to every education major? This information benefits every child sitting in a classroom.

Rant over...
Edited by heathermomster on March 16 2012 01:19 PM
 
squeakymonster
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Posted on March 16 2012 03:23 PM
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Dyscalculia is just now being talked about in Ed classes. Even then, it's just briefly for the most part. Memorization is still used because it's easier for most people and takes less time than having to sit there and figure it out using other methods (I sit there and figure it out because I have memory issues). As more people learn about dyscalculia, hopefully, things will improve. I remember in 5th grade, 7th grade, and again in 11th grade my teachers figured out I don't know my multiplication tables. This was about 5-15 years ago and dyscalculia wasn't well known yet. I was told I had to learn them or else. I tried. I know a few of the easier ones. I can figure out most of the rest.
I'm NOT lost, I'm just taking the scenic rout!
 
heathermomster
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Posted on March 17 2012 07:51 PM
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As more people learn about dyscalculia, hopefully, things will improve.


Given the appalling math test scores of neuro-typical students in the US, I would not be holding my breath.
 
badkitty
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Posted on March 18 2012 03:16 AM
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Just straight memorization. It took me months and no television until then (before home computers, game consoles, cell phones). I missed Battlestar Galactica (the original series). I still resent that.

My parents weren't to savvy as to different learning strategies and methodology, and frankly didn't care to involve themselves in ever helping me with homework, except for help typing a paper in high school. If I didn't know what a word meant "You know where the dictionary is..."

Oh and I was threatened with being held back in school if I didn't memorize the multiplication tables/long division.
Edited by badkitty on March 18 2012 03:19 AM
 
Imayhavedyscalculia
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Posted on March 18 2012 04:03 AM
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Squeaky- i'm the same way! i can remember some 6s,the 11s and 10s. But the rest i have to take some time on :/
 
Imayhavedyscalculia
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Posted on March 18 2012 04:04 AM
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Squeaky- i'm the same way! i can remember some 6s,the 11s and 10s. But the rest i have to take some time on :/
 
justfoundout
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Posted on March 19 2012 01:05 AM
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3/18/12
Badkitty,
Your experience is similar to mine in regard to practicing the piano. I spent the first hour after I'd get home from school every day doing my 'hour a day' of practicing. That was the hour when everybody else in the neighborhood was out running around in the street,... roller skating, riding bikes, running into each other's backyards to use swingsets and slides. Then when my hour of practice was over, I was at liberty to go ring doorbell after doorbell, hunting for a playmate, only to be told that they were all "sitting down for dinner now".

My reading of the written score was painstakingly slow, and often, I'd just practice playing the same mistakes over and over. - jus'
Edited by justfoundout on March 19 2012 01:10 AM
 
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