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Do you tell people that you have dyscalculia?





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dyscalculia in school
livsmom
#1 Print Post
Posted on April 20 2011 12:50 PM
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Hi,
My daughter staretd school just after T-giving. We had homeschooled for 4 years and I had to go back to work. She is 11 in the fifth grade.

She has visual processing issues and has had a dyscalculia diagnosis for three years. School is really stressing her out. they have loads of homework. It is a Catholic school in Memphis. I am having to educate the counselors and teachers about dyscalculia. But there is nothing I can do to make them stop giving so much homework. They do let me cut math homework if necessary.

I am not sure what would be a good educational environment for her. She is gifted in writing, art. They hae a dyslexia school in Memphis but not dyscalculia.

any input welcome.
 
RottieWoman
#2 Print Post
Posted on April 20 2011 01:21 PM
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welcome, livsmom!

since she is officially diagnosed, you may have some more options than if she wasn't...but not being in a public school<?> may also mean more challenges. I don't know from Catholic schools but am wondering if there some body or agency involved in that system you can discuss with besides the teachers.... meeting with principle and teacher? Is there a Special Ed advisor/M-Team, or department in the school or system somewhere you can call a meeting with?

You could consider checking out your local university's Department/Division/Office of Disability Services - learning disabilities specialist or the supervisor of the entire office...bear with me...I thought this cuz the staff there may have access to educational resources, ideas, personnel that you as a private individual with a school-age child may not have access to, or know about. So maybe they could offer some advice or point you in an <child> age-appropriate direction.
also, the same university's head or dean of Exceptional Educational Studies <for their students- student teachers> may be able to offer something.

I thought about these as opposed to school-age testing services for young children since you wrote that she has the diagnosis and am not sure they will assist you further - BUT they might, doesn't hurt to try....
more ideas:

http://www.learni...es-tn.org/ <state LD org.>

http://disabiliti...rning.com/ <specific testing organization>

http://therapists...p;spec=184
<LD testing listing in Memphis area - first one- Hugh D. Moore PhD>

http://www.mcsk12...s_clue.asp
<gifted and talented students in Memphis city schools...link to that/staff contact ...maybe assist you>
 
livsmom
#3 Print Post
Posted on April 20 2011 01:36 PM
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thanks for the info. also has anyone heard of on cloud nine math as a viable intervention. it is done by the lindamood-bell centers.
 
RottieWoman
#4 Print Post
Posted on April 24 2011 01:06 PM
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no prob., livmom
nope haven't heard of it...

best wishes....
 
justfoundout
#5 Print Post
Posted on April 24 2011 10:20 PM
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4/24/11
Hi livsmom,
It's nice to have you here. On the 'cloud nine', likewise as RW, haven't heard of it. - jus'
 
heathermomster
#6 Print Post
Posted on May 24 2011 10:20 PM
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Hi there,

Our children are the same grade and age. DS attended private Christian school since pre-k. I pulled him out of school at the end of 1st semester 5th grade because the school had new teachers and principal with a new attitude ie...not wanting to help my son due to his dysgraphia.

DS is intellectually gifted with dyscalculia/dysgraphia/dyslexia. DS is tutored for dyslexia but received no remediation for handwriting and math except by me. DS received mostly A's and a couple of B's by studying his butt off and it was getting to be too much.

Since being home, DS has learned to type and now knows his multiplication facts and we are currently working on long division and 2 by 3 digit multiplication.

We have worked on mental math using the grade 2 Singapore Mental Math and two books written by Ronit Bird. You can look up the author over at Amazon. I also incorporate cuisenaire rods and Math Made Meaningful. It's not hard to do.

Never heard of cloud 9 math;however, my son's Wilson reading specialist taught reading using the Lindamood-Bell method and swears by it.
Edited by heathermomster on May 25 2011 12:01 AM
 
justfoundout
#7 Print Post
Posted on May 25 2011 02:20 AM
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5/24/11
Dear Heathermomster,
I can just imagine how much work that has been for all of you. I'm glad that you've found some programs that help. I'm sorry that I can't say anything more helpful or supportive. I don't have children, and I'm only dyscalculic, having no dyslexia or dysgraphia.

I hope that other parents will be able to find the resources you've mentioned. If you'd like, you might also post something similar down on 'Other Disabilities' at the bottom of the list on this forum. I'm glad you came back to 'share'.

Let me also suggest to you the forum BeingDyslexic. They are mostly UK folks, many asking about different programs for their children. - jus'
Edited by justfoundout on May 25 2011 02:21 AM
 
dlynnhi
#8 Print Post
Posted on June 03 2011 10:10 AM
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It has been a huge struggle through the years fighting for my daughter throughout her K12 years. Never knew there was such a thing as Dyscalculia. All I can say, it was worth the effort. She'll soon graduate with a degree in math from a very prestigious university. She minored in Studio Art in order to keep her sanity.

She's a gifted writer. That went a long way in helping her maintain a high GPA.

All I can recommend is be your daughter's fearless, tireless advocate. Support and believe in her. Until there is a better understanding of the best way to teach dyscalculia affected children, it will be a constant battle to get her needs met.

About the homework... I made a deal with my daughter. She was excused from her chores as long as she was working on her schoolwork. It was very motivating.
 
RottieWoman
#9 Print Post
Posted on June 03 2011 11:55 PM
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hello again dlynnhi!

I sure do agree how important it is to be your child's advocate, and not only that - to ACTUALLY see that your child has LD and work with that. My folks have always been great advocates for me and for public education but my mom chooses not to believe I have LD.

I also enjoy writing and as a child put together many short stories.
 
momof2
#10 Print Post
Posted on November 15 2011 03:51 AM
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I am new to this forum but am in a similar situation. I have a 14 year old w/ dyscalculia but she has always been extremely artistic and a fluent reader; all A's in all subjects but math.

My son however is stressing and struggling so much he is threatening to run away from home. He was just diagnosed w/ dyscalculia AND dysgraphia which makes writing laborios and slow. I was thinking of switchingSad him to a local catholic school to have a smaller classroom setting! Now I am confused.
 
momof2
#11 Print Post
Posted on November 15 2011 03:54 AM
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I would also like to ask about ANY math intervention that will help my son understand basic math facts that he should have grasped in 2nd grade or so. The techniques I used with my daughter are not helping and he is so frustrated.

Do any of you feel homeschooling is the answer? I need something to build his self esteem and confidence!

Thanks to any and all comments!
 
heathermomster
#12 Print Post
Posted on November 15 2011 02:47 PM
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I'm a huge proponent of homeschooling, provided you are willing to explore your options. If you decide to do that, look at the Math U See curriculum and find an LD Mom support group.

My 6th grader has attended the same private Christian school since pre-K. Earlier in this thread I mentioned pulling DS 2nd semester, 5th grade to homeschool. Academically homeschool wise, DS did extremely well. Our issues dealt with socialization because he missed seeing his lifelong friends on a daily basis.

He is back at school for the present, but it's my wish to keep him home. DS really needs one on one attention and we are doing that in the evening now. The time spent in the evening gets to be too much and the classroom pace is too fast. DS is barely hanging on.

When you pull a child mid school year, it's very difficult to join a good homeschool group. In my area, the highly sought after homeschool groups accept applications Jan-Feb for the next school year. There's a huge interview process. All of our homeschool friends belong to one particular group and that group was full. We are in different states so your experience may be different.

To help your child. I'll tell you what I did and your mileage may vary..I read a book by Sousa called "How the Brain Learns Mathematics." This book was huge for me because there were specific suggestions on how to approach my son when teaching.

Secondly, I used books by Ronit Bird. We used Cuisenaire rods and metric graph paper and explored relationships of numbers. For basic numeracy, we used a Slavonic abacus which is a two colored abacus. I taught DS to partition numbers. The number 14 isn't just 14. It's a 10+4. "We also used Metal Math Grade 2" book by Singapore.

I really stressed teaching the concept using concrete manipulatives. It's not enough to give a child a list of numbers and tell them to memorize. Some little robots can do that, but my robot needs to know the concept first.

No flash cards...Good grief, no flash cards. Not until they can confidently answer on paper did I even think about flash cards.

I limited math time to 30-40 minutes. We usually pursued math in the morning and for 30 minutes in the afternoon.

E-mail me if you have ??s.

Blessings,Heather
 
momof2
#13 Print Post
Posted on December 03 2011 01:36 AM
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heathermomster wrote:
I'm a huge proponent of homeschooling, provided you are willing to explore your options. If you decide to do that, look at the Math U See curriculum and find an LD Mom support group.

My 6th grader has attended the same private Christian school since pre-K. Earlier in this thread I mentioned pulling DS 2nd semester, 5th grade to homeschool. Academically homeschool wise, DS did extremely well. Our issues dealt with socialization because he missed seeing his lifelong friends on a daily basis.

He is back at school for the present, but it's my wish to keep him home. DS really needs one on one attention and we are doing that in the evening now. The time spent in the evening gets to be too much and the classroom pace is too fast. DS is barely hanging on.

When you pull a child mid school year, it's very difficult to join a good homeschool group. In my area, the highly sought after homeschool groups accept applications Jan-Feb for the next school year. There's a huge interview process. All of our homeschool friends belong to one particular group and that group was full. We are in different states so your experience may be different.

To help your child. I'll tell you what I did and your mileage may vary..I read a book by Sousa called "How the Brain Learns Mathematics." This book was huge for me because there were specific suggestions on how to approach my son when teaching.

Secondly, I used books by Ronit Bird. We used Cuisenaire rods and metric graph paper and explored relationships of numbers. For basic numeracy, we used a Slavonic abacus which is a two colored abacus. I taught DS to partition numbers. The number 14 isn't just 14. It's a 10+4. "We also used Metal Math Grade 2" book by Singapore.

I really stressed teaching the concept using concrete manipulatives. It's not enough to give a child a list of numbers and tell them to memorize. Some little robots can do that, but my robot needs to know the concept first.

No flash cards...Good grief, no flash cards. Not until they can confidently answer on paper did I even think about flash cards.

I limited math time to 30-40 minutes. We usually pursued math in the morning and for 30 minutes in the afternoon.

E-mail me if you have ??s.

Blessings,Heather
 
momof2
#14 Print Post
Posted on December 03 2011 01:37 AM
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I ordered the book thru my library "How the Brain Learns Mathmatics". It is very intersting and I am off to get an abacus this weeken. Thank you!

Momof2
 
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