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Leaving Out Words When You Write
GaryR55
#1 Print Post
Posted on April 22 2010 02:55 AM
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How many here have a chronic problem with leaving out words when you write? This is one of the most maddening things I do and I'm just wondering if it's related to dyscalculia, or perhaps dyslexia.

It appears, to me, that my brain believes I've written or typed the word, when I haven't. There's a disconnect between the thought of the word and getting it on paper or typing it. It seems I do it more frequently in typing, but I also do it, sometimes, when writing by hand, as well. I've done some reading on this, on the internet, and found that some have noticed it's usually articles of speech that are left out the most frequently (a, an, the, etc.), but I also find myself leaving out larger words, as well.

Gary
 
classclownfish
#2 Print Post
Posted on April 22 2010 03:03 AM
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I do the same thing all the time! I also, when writing by hand, will forget the last letter of a word then append it onto the next word and drop the last letter so there's the same number of letters. For example:

"I sat under the sweet tree" can sometimes turn into
"I sat under the swee ttre" or something like that
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GaryR55
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Posted on April 22 2010 04:00 AM
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I do that, too! Or I'll leave out letters, even though I know very well how to spell the word. It's as though, "Well, I thought it, so it should be there!"

We've got to see if other dyscalculics experience this, also. I think there must be some connection. Also, this seems to be getting worse as I age (I'll be 58 later this year). Maybe I should buy Dragon Naturally Speaking and just sit here and talk; that way all my words will get typed. Wink

Gary
 
CheshireKat
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Posted on April 22 2010 04:02 AM
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I don't leave out words, but I do sometimes reverse letters or skip them entirely. I blame the skipped letters on my brain moving faster than my hand can keep up, because it doesn't happen when I type, only when I write longhand. The letter reversing might have something to do with the fact that I also reverse numbers a lot... maybe they're on the same pathway in my brain or something, the part of my brain that keeps things in their proper order, I don't know. But again, that doesn't happen when I'm typing, only when I'm writing.
"The hardest arithmetic to master is that which enables us to count our blessings." - Eric Hoffer
 
Mohinga
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Posted on April 22 2010 07:45 AM
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I have the same problem and blame it on my brain being faster than my hands.
When we had exams at school, my paper was always full of crossed out words which in turn meant a low grade for neatness.

When trying to get used to a new keyboard, I have to check every word I write before sending it off - the one we have now really hates me so I take ages to write even simple sentences..
I'm a violin so stop trying to make me sound like a piano!!

Dyscalculia doesn't bother me as much as all the nasty accessories that came with it
 
GaryR55
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Posted on April 22 2010 03:55 PM
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That's usually the way I describe it, too, Mohinga. Of course, in reality, it's something more complex than that. Some sort of cognitive disconnect between thought and action.

Gary
 
Mohinga
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Posted on April 22 2010 07:43 PM
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GaryR55 wrote:
That's usually the way I describe it, too, Mohinga. Of course, in reality, it's something more complex than that. Some sort of cognitive disconnect between thought and action.

Gary


My mum always said I was slow = lazy, but I've only just realized that I need to do things slowly to make sure I get them right.
I'm a violin so stop trying to make me sound like a piano!!

Dyscalculia doesn't bother me as much as all the nasty accessories that came with it
 
GaryR55
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Posted on April 23 2010 01:07 AM
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It was mostly my little sister and my father who gave me that treatment.

Even working slowly - veeeeeery sloooooooowly - doesn't help me. I will never, ever comprehend anything more complex than "simple" arithmetic. I believe this is the case because that's where I was when algebra was first thrown at me, at the age of ten. Hence, my math skills are at the level of a ten year old. If the grey matter is damaged (and the latest research into the causes of dyscalulia suggests it is either damaged or underdeveloped), then it simply isn't functional, no matter how much time one takes.

Gary
Edited by GaryR55 on April 23 2010 01:08 AM
 
Arwen Evenstar
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Posted on April 23 2010 06:52 AM
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Sometimes I leave out words or misspell them, but with verbal skills, my brain works at light-speed and my hands just can't keep up with it.
 
GaryR55
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Posted on April 23 2010 07:05 AM
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Arwen Evenstar wrote:
Sometimes I leave out words or misspell them, but with verbal skills, my brain works at light-speed and my hands just can't keep up with it.



That seems to be the common description between all of us, Arwen; i.e., fingers not being able to keep up with the brain. I know it seems that way, to all of us, including myself, but I think the reality is some sort of communication failure between the brain and the motor impulses that control our hands. I've corrected it, but, damn it, I just left the "e" off of "the" in the preceding sentence! Arrrgh! I also left out the word "it" after the word "know." Can't even write about it without it happening! Crap! I left out the word "about." LOL

Gary
Edited by GaryR55 on April 23 2010 07:09 AM
 
Arwen Evenstar
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Posted on April 24 2010 05:35 AM
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GaryR55 wrote:
Arwen Evenstar wrote:
Sometimes I leave out words or misspell them, but with verbal skills, my brain works at light-speed and my hands just can't keep up with it.



That seems to be the common description between all of us, Arwen; i.e., fingers not being able to keep up with the brain. I know it seems that way, to all of us, including myself, but I think the reality is some sort of communication failure between the brain and the motor impulses that control our hands. I've corrected it, but, damn it, I just left the "e" off of "the" in the preceding sentence! Arrrgh! I also left out the word "it" after the word "know." Can't even write about it without it happening! Crap! I left out the word "about." LOL

Gary


Oh, I agree-there probably is some sort of crossed wires with the brain and the fingers. I think too fast in general though haha.
 
GaryR55
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Posted on April 24 2010 05:43 AM
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Must be because you're a New Yorker. Slow down! Wink

Damn it! I left out the word "a!"

Gary
Edited by GaryR55 on April 24 2010 05:44 AM
 
Mohinga
#13 Print Post
Posted on April 24 2010 08:39 AM
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It also happens when I talk. My sentences are 100% perfect when sent from my brain to my mouth but, once they pass my lips, become weird little piles of words that are more word puzzles than the wonderful wisdom I intended them to be.

And I had to start this one three times before I got it right...
I'm a violin so stop trying to make me sound like a piano!!

Dyscalculia doesn't bother me as much as all the nasty accessories that came with it
 
tr3slunas
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Posted on April 24 2010 06:34 PM
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For me it is a letter thing, I wrote the word multiplex as muliplex around 100 times in one essay, I also leave letter off of the end of words so they becomes the etc, it is a very common thing for me- I also mix b, d and p up I believe it is a dyspraxic thing although I am not diagnosed yet.
Count me in! Wink
 
tr3slunas
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Posted on April 24 2010 06:36 PM
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ha did it in this post 'letters' lol
Count me in! Wink
 
brack02
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Posted on April 24 2010 08:07 PM
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That's me to a T!!!! I always wonder why i left letters out or left eh last one off the end of the previous word and added it onto the beginning of the next word!!! i also transpose letters, which makes for interesting words!!!!
 
Arwen Evenstar
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Posted on April 25 2010 06:23 AM
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GaryR55 wrote:
Must be because you're a New Yorker. Slow down! Wink

Damn it! I left out the word "a!"

Gary


Hahahahaha!

A+ comment, would lol again.
 
dysflexei
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Posted on May 09 2010 03:04 PM
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I've this problem . I skip words usually when i write . But the entire sentence has been formed in my mind before i write . But still , i skip some words when in the process of writing . i realise this only after reading the matter after writing it .
 
GaryR55
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Posted on May 09 2010 07:08 PM
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dysflexei wrote:
I've this problem . I skip words usually when i write . But the entire sentence has been formed in my mind before i write . But still , i skip some words when in the process of writing . i realise this only after reading the matter after writing it .




The same with me. I think it, then write it. Sometimes it happens so quickly and spontaneously, it seems I'm writing what I think as I think it, but, really, I've already pre-conceived what I want to say. Apparently, my brain behaves as if merely the act of thinking it should have been sufficient to transfer it to the page, somehow.

Gary
 
kendustin7
#20 Print Post
Posted on May 27 2010 01:24 PM
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I generally don't miss out the words but misspell the words while writing or typing and after thinking for a long time I used to know that I did the mistake.
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