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The Dyscalculia Forum :: Other Dyscalculia Topics :: Dyscalculia Chat
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Timelessness and time distortion?! anyone?
EarlyWarning
#1 Print Post
Posted on December 08 2009 08:46 PM
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I'm wondering if there is anyone else with dyscalculia that has sever problems with time.?
I experience timelessness.. and more than just being unable to create time lines and being unaware of the passage of time. My sense of time is distorted and time passes very quickly without my awareness.. i perceive everything more than a day ago *or a few hours when i'm tired*, as happened days or weeks ago. But fun events and activities always feel like i just did them last week. i feel i've known people and built relationships with them for a long time, when i haven't known them for more than a few months.. And when i'm in a stressful conversation or argument i can't hold what people say in my head.. it dissolves in my head and i loose track of what i'm supposed to be thinking about or responding to.
but perhaps the weirdest is that whenever i move cities it feels like a the last place was a separate lifetime or reality lived long ago... but i feel each lifetime as if they were each only brief moments in my life. And when i reflect on them i experience what you see in vampire and immortal movies.. it's something that happened centuries ago.. and although i can recall feelings and thoughts and everything it is still stained in a distant time.

And i have the reg stuff to.. jumble up math formulas and sequences, Turn maps around in my head, can't remember names, can't do schedules.. and absolute crap with money budgeting. Super sensitive to light, sound, peoples attitudes (energy) and temperatures. but i have a near photographic memory.. as long as it isn't dealing with anything time or number related.. *i can basically watch my fav shows in my head when i'm bored*
And i have very powerful visualization abilities.
You May not Live, But you will Die.
 
teecobug
#2 Print Post
Posted on December 08 2009 09:35 PM
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hello EarlyWarning Smile
yes, everything you described sounds EXACTLY like me.
i have never been able to remember names unless they mean something to me, and even then, i have to have REALLY strong fealings for them.
in my head, there is no time. everything is just a jumble of things that have no order whatsoever.
i bet you are empath, i am to.
we can feal others emotions and have no problem putting ourselvs in others shows. in my case, i can see auras. you have probably had dreams of future that have, or have yet to come true. empaths are people with auras who feal like they should help, when they help they pick up negitive energy and keep them in there aura and that person is then lightend.

i also have a near photographic memory, but only to things that i think are beautiful or important. i love birds, i feal as though i can speak to them, i have "spoken" to some birds and the moment i start they flutter down and practicaly sit on my lap. my favorate was a raven named evil. he folowed me across many states, yet, he is still wild and i cannot make him do anything he does not wish to do.

if there is anything i can do to help, tell me Smile
teeco
 
saruna
#3 Print Post
Posted on December 08 2009 10:08 PM
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Welcome to the Forum Early Warning,

I'm pretty much always wandering around feeling like I'm lost. I sometimes embarrass myself by telling a story about something that happened the day before as if several months had passed.

When I have an appointment, I'm really paranoid about being late so I usually end up there several hours early. It can be really awkward but if I don't come really early, I will show up late and I HATE being late.

I don't have a photographic memory but I have something like it. My friends say that I've got a tape recorder for a brain because I have a very good memory for sounds, music and conversation. I can't "picture" anything in my mind, not even a simple shape but I think in words constantly. It's like I'm my own narrator.

I think someone here called it the Mind's Ear but I can't remember now.
Edited by saruna on December 08 2009 10:08 PM
 
RottieWoman
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Posted on December 08 2009 10:09 PM
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hi, EarlyWarning and teeco!

Several things rang true for me, too -

am very empathic, sense other's energy, feel it physically sometimes, have lots "deja vu", sensitive to light, see pictures in my head....speak to non-human beings....

I do have sense of time and sense of direction - but realize that time is not linear, time has no beginning and no ending, is beyond words, words don't really capture essence of being
 
EarlyWarning
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Posted on December 08 2009 10:45 PM
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Awesome!!

yes i'm very empathetic too..and have a deep spirituality..

I used to speak to cats.. but then as i got older i thought it must of just been a part of being a kid and chalked it up to overactive imagination.

Yes i love living in my sense of timelessness.. and nonlinear time. In fact, i get very irritated by having to exist in other peoples time, if i have to wait for someone to call or be somewhere important at an exact time.. i end up clock watching for what feels like a day just so i don't miss it.

I kind of feel like i am a slave to this fictional time that runs society... it really irritates me.. i just want to be. And not worry about being measured in something that doesn't exist to me.

Cool thx for the reply's, i feel loads better knowing there are others.. =)


You May not Live, But you will Die.
 
RottieWoman
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Posted on December 08 2009 10:58 PM
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glad to have you on, EarlyWarning!
 
EarlyWarning
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Posted on December 08 2009 11:14 PM
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Thx RottieWoman Wink
You May not Live, But you will Die.
 
RottieWoman
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Posted on December 09 2009 03:56 AM
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Smile
 
Nissa
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Posted on December 09 2009 06:11 AM
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Hi EarlyWarning,
I don't have trouble with time myself, but I think that's a fairly common trait among dyscalculics. There's a great book called My Thirteenth Winter about a girl growing up with dyscalculia, and she doesn't have any concept of time either. She talks about having to use different colored highlighters to mark blocks of time in her day planner so she can see how much time she will be spending on various activities.
 
Arwen Evenstar
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Posted on December 09 2009 07:15 AM
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Hiya!

"i feel i've known people and built relationships with them for a long time, when i haven't known them for more than a few months.. " I am just like this, but I also think it's due to the fact that I'm clairsentient (similar to an empath) as well.

So with you on bad sense of time though. I have a tendancy to fall asleep and randomly wake up in the middle of the night 'cause I think it's time to get up and realize I've only been asleep for an hour. Even unconcious and in a deep sleep I can't tell time haha.
 
internationalmama
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Posted on December 09 2009 07:50 AM
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Hi EarlyWarning,
I have a 9 year old daughter that feets in your description, too. It has helped me a lot to understand how she sees life, in order to guide her in her learning process and problems.
What shocks me about her (and your description, too) is this photographic memory. We´ve been living in different countries in her short life and she recalls places very accurately and she ALWAYS knows if she´s been there before.
Actually, I was totally unaware of this visual thinking, till a doctor suggested us to read one of Ronald Davis´ book. This Davis discovered his own way to overcome dyslexia (and became rich and successful!!!). His discovery that he was thinking in images and therefore creating his own method is really impressive.
That made me think a lot about my daughter, because it was obvious to me that she struggled with maths (and was diagnosed positively), but I couldn´t find the connexion between her lack of abstract thinking in maths and the same incapability with the language. In her case, it was difficult to learn the meaning of the word "jealous", because there´s no image behind the concept. So I did a lot of drawings in order to help her learn these abstract words, and she did a lot of improvement in language learning.
My daughter makes a therapy to help her deal with dyscalculia issues (I live in Germany ) which aims in building the alternative neuronal connexions to help her understand the number sense and among others "time". She couldn´t read an analogal clock or understanding the pass of time. In the last months she did a significant step forward and she will receive her first watch for her next birthday. She is very excited!!!
 
EarlyWarning
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Posted on December 09 2009 04:14 PM
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Hmmm .. clairsentient, i had to look that up to see what it meant.

I think it's kinda like this trick i like to do at Christmas time that freaks everyone out. Wink I'll hold a gift from someone and concentrate on the package and their energy and i get a picture flashes in my head of what it is.. it's always fun.
In my teens friends and family had taken to trying to trick me by placing objects or more than one gift inside of the same box to try and confuse me.. LOL. I always know whats in the box but my interpretation of the pictures misleads me to think of something else or a combination of the pictures.. LOL it's kinda funny.. so I can actually get surprised when i open gifts now.. Wink

Thx Nissa, i'll add that to my book want list.

Hey Internationalmamma =) Thankyou for telling me about your daughter.. i feel better *and normal* knowing there are more people like me around. =) if u ever need insight into anything time/distorted view i'll help as much as i can.. like as for numbers.. i make pictures in my head that represent the numbers.. like 1 is a bat.. 2 is a light switch, 3 is a cerberus, 4 is spinning 4 X4 wheels, 5 is a pair of mickey mouse gloves.. and so on up to ten.. I found i have to associate whatever the first image is that comes to mind when i think of the number.. if i try to change it to something else that makes more sense to me i screw it up in my head. And with this technique i visualize the objects to interact with each other in a dynamic, entertaining and explosive way.. and this way i can remember numbers, do basic math, create lists, remember stuff and read clocks.
I'm a 3D computer animator and Visual effects artist.. and i couldn't have done school without this process. Wink

And I tell people not to always pressure me to do things with the thought that i regard time the same way they do.. if i havn't done it.. instead of yelling at me or getting upset with me.. just tell me you asked me to this or that so many days or weeks ago.. and i'll be like OH sorry! i didn't realize it had been that long.. i better get on that. whereas if you just pressure me.. i'm like piss off! and leave me alone. i'll do it later.
You May not Live, But you will Die.
 
Arwen Evenstar
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Posted on December 10 2009 07:51 AM
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Early warning: yep, clairsentient is basically an energy reader, although what you're describing is psychometry. All of that is related.

Mine manifests in being able to read people and places. Always on instinct, I've never tried to force myself to read on command. I'm handy with tarot though, which ties into the whole energy-reader thing.

Also with you with getting irritated at people pressuring you to get things done-writing notes to myself has helped immensely hehe.
 
Kestrel6
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Posted on December 10 2009 06:13 PM
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YES, in fact I was thinking about starting a "time" thread myself! I can look at the clock and (eventually) puzzle out that it's, say, eight fourty five, but then it STAYS 8:45 in my head. When I look at the clock ten minutes later, I'm always a bit surprised that it's now 8:55.
This is especially inconvenient in the mornings, when progress toward getting dressed and going to work must be maintained. I manage by putting a news-talk radio station on, because they announce the time every ten minutes with the traffic/weather report.
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justfoundout
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Posted on December 10 2009 09:09 PM
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12/10/09
This may be just slightly 'off topic', but to me it has some kind of 'link' -- (else, I wouldn't have thought of it?).

I read a book by this famous author, Oliver Sacks. In his collection of stories was one 'case study' about a man who had almost no short term memory. Those taking care of him in an institution found that the best surroundings for him were allowing him to 'garden', as the passing of time, being measured by the changes in the garden, did not cause him undue disorientation.

This was within the pages of the book entitled, "The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat". Wiki says this: "The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat and Other Clinical Tales is a 1985 book by neurologist Oliver Sacks describing the case histories of some of his patients." - jus'
Edited by justfoundout on December 10 2009 09:14 PM
 
Addy
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Posted on December 10 2009 09:22 PM
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Hi Early Warning,

I'm terrible with time too.

Several years ago I had a Girl Scout Troop, and for one of their badges we were learning how to estimate things like time, space, and distance. One of the exercises was to try and estimate when a minute had gone by while the other leader ran a stopwatch and wrote down our answers.

I was the last person to think that a full minute had gone by, and by that time, a full two-and-a-half minutes had actually passed. No wonder I'm always late!
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justfoundout
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Posted on December 10 2009 09:38 PM
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12/10/09
My perserverance paid off. It's Chapter two: The lost mariner, in the book, The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat, that I was thinking of above. And I even found it (or most of it) online in a pdf file. Here's the link, and here's the portion in particular that I was thinking of. - jus'

http://www.99chan...For_A_.pdf
[This is the story of Jimmie G. - The Lost Mariner.]
"The same depth of absorption and attention was to be seen in relation to music and art: he had no difficulty, I noticed, ‘following’ music or simple dramas, for every moment in music and art refers to, contains, other moments. He liked gardening, and had taken over some of the work in our garden. At first he greeted the garden each day as new, but for some reason this had become more familiar to him than the inside of the Home. He almost never got lost or disoriented in the garden now; he patterned it, I think, on loved and remembered gardens from his youth in Connecticut.

Jimmie, who was so lost in extensional ‘spatial’ time, was perfectly organized in Bergsonian ‘intentional’ time; what was fugitive, unsustainable, as formal structure, was perfectly stable, perfectly held, as art or will. Moreover, there was something that endured and survived. If Jimmie was briefly ‘held’ by a task or puzzle or game or calculation, held in the purely mental challenge of these, he would fall apart as soon as they were done, into the abyss of his nothingness, his amnesia."
Edited by justfoundout on December 10 2009 09:40 PM
 
Arwen Evenstar
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Posted on December 11 2009 05:38 AM
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Jus-yes! I read about that in HS psychology. Fascinating story. The Man who mistook his wife for a hat was also interesting as well.
 
justfoundout
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Posted on December 11 2009 06:00 PM
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12/11/09
Dear Arwen Evenstar,
Yes, that was a great story. Last year, I'd been walking through Barnes and Noble, on my way out, actually, not even looking for anything in particular. But they were having a sale, so I glanced at what was On Sale, lying on a table. The title just caught my attention. I'd never heard of Oliver Sacks at the time. But I'd just found out that my problem with name/face recollection was one possible symptom of dyscalculia, so I opened the book,... and fell in love with it on the spot. I'm glad to see that you liked it, too. - jus'
 
CheshireKat
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Posted on December 11 2009 06:39 PM
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I am actually great at estimating time as long as there is daylight. It's not that I pay particular attention to the position of the sun or try to measure it (and in fact I can't read a sundial to save my life) but something about the movement of the sun across the sky triggers my more "innate" or "natural" sense of the passage of time. If I'm laying out at the pool during the summer, for example, I can be out there for hours and always estimate the time within 5-10 minutes.

But at night, I am completely timeless. I will start reading or writing and think that an hour has passed, only to look at the clock and realize three hours have passed. Something about the lack of a natural "night clock" throws off my time estimation wildly. Maybe it has to do with the fact that biologically, our natural circadian rhythms dictate that we should be sleeping when it's dark so we shouldn't need to be able to estimate time? Or maybe I really am picking up on the sun a lot more than I think I am.

Either way, I can't read a clock to save my life but I can tell you what time it is with eerie accuracy if it's light out.
"The hardest arithmetic to master is that which enables us to count our blessings." - Eric Hoffer
 
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