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What are reading right now?
RottieWoman
Posted on February 09 2010 01:59 PM
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really intriguing to read such an array of peoples different interests and background in books!
I remember that "Scarlet Letter" now - I did like that. And Poe's stuff was kinda neat for me but am not otherwise much for poetry. Liked Thoreau's Walden. Enjoyed the Mists of Avalon.

My very first Breyer model WAS the pony mare Misty, and then I got her foal and eventually I had Black Beauty too and about 10 others.
Smile
 
justfoundout
Posted on February 09 2010 04:05 PM
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2/9/10
All in all, we've had a lot of 'shared history' through some of those 'Classic' readings. And, me too, Kat. I'm absolutely overwhelmed with my Biology reading, and the Labs. It's all information that I truly love and have always wanted to learn, but the sheer quantity of the readings and lists of things to memorize in such a short amount of time is, in my case, just sad. It's like flying past something really intriguing while driving on a freeway,... not much time to ponder. - jus'
 
RottieWoman
Posted on February 09 2010 06:46 PM
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I remember in my high school AP Bio we had hoards of reading to do and the text was a first or second year college-level book; we also had to purchase an additional book. All that reading helped me prep for the university Bio classes.
 
elena532
Posted on February 10 2010 08:57 AM
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Smile
Addy wrote:
elena532 wrote:
Scilence of the lamb- thomas harris

Vital Lies, Simple Truths: The Psychology of Self-Deception- Daniel Goleman


That sounds about as cheerful as the book I've moved on to ... "Settling Scores", which is about the attempted de-Nazification of the postwar German classical music world.

Yeah, light reading Smile


Pfft And Im only 13! Wink
I am actually reading a book ...called...by ??? Ok I forget but its also about nazis and how young german boys were forced in to hitler group sort of things with out knowing what was really going on etc.

I am reading... Sworn to silence by linda castillo (5 stars already)
Don't annoy me, I am running out of places to hid the bodiesPfft
 
elena532
Posted on February 18 2010 04:46 PM
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I am reading..
The stuff of nightmares by malorie blackman

Don't annoy me, I am running out of places to hid the bodiesPfft
 
RosieLee
Posted on February 23 2010 10:58 AM
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Hi everyone
Iris Murdoch is a brilliant writer (sadly now deceased), but "The Black Prince" is fabulous.
Does anyone else also like Henning Mankell?
 
CheshireKat
Posted on February 23 2010 05:14 PM
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Jus - I know how you feel. I wish there was more time to dwell on and really investigate the most interesting aspects of my classes... I guess that's what grad school is for, huh? Right now this is all foundational stuff. I did get to have a really awesome lab today for my Biological Anthropology class though, it was a practical and we had to pick up unlabeled bones and identify what they were, where they were located relative to the body (distal, medial, etc.) Love this subject, and am totally wild about my labs. I love hands-on stuff like that.

I still have not had time for any pleasure reading since my last post. I can't wait until spring break when I can finally kick back on the beach or at the pool and just read to my heart's content! I am banning myself from doing school-related readings during that week, so that I can sink my teeth into something enjoyable instead. Not that my textbooks aren't enjoyable (or at least the subject matter they cover), but I would really love to do some pleasure reading too.
"The hardest arithmetic to master is that which enables us to count our blessings." - Eric Hoffer
 
justfoundout
Posted on February 24 2010 06:56 PM
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2/24/10
Dear Kat,
I think that being able to look at a bone, know what it is, and where it would be 'located' would be an amazing accomplishment. How does this work? Are your studies/observations on bones limited, for now, to mammals' bones? - jus'
 
CheshireKat
Posted on February 25 2010 12:39 AM
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Jus - It is so cool, I can't even put words to it. I had my lab practical yesterday and basically there were just a bunch of primate (including human) bones laid out on the tables and we had to answer a bunch of questions about them.

We had to pick them up and know what they were on the human body, we had to label pelvises as male or female, and we had a bunch of primate skulls that we had to categorize based on dentition, nasal structure, post-orbital bars, etc. We had to name off random sutures and parts of human bones, and it was just the coolest lab I've ever done.

And yes, we only do mammals in our lab, no bony fishes, birds, or reptiles. We have adult human skeletons as well as a chimpanzee, a dog, a macaque, a fruit bat, and the very small (and sad) skeleton of a stillborn infant, about 30 weeks along.
"The hardest arithmetic to master is that which enables us to count our blessings." - Eric Hoffer
 
justfoundout
Posted on February 25 2010 01:09 AM
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2/24/10
Dear Kat,
That does sound unbelievable. Imagine how, long ago, not even 'doctors' had that kind of knowledge of human anatomy. And, even after they learned anatomy, they didn't 'share' with everybody else. You aren't thinking of doing forensic science now, are you? - jus'
 
Kestrel6
Posted on February 25 2010 01:17 AM
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RottieWoman wrote:

My very first Breyer model WAS the pony mare Misty, and then I got her foal and eventually I had Black Beauty too and about 10 others.
Smile


Me too! I had Misty, Midnight Sun, and Man O'War
Blessed are the PURR in heart!
 
http://twicetoldtails.googlepages.com
CheshireKat
Posted on February 25 2010 02:44 PM
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Jus - As amazingly fascinating as forensics and biological anthropology is, I don't think I'm going to pursue it, no. It is a very narrow field with very limited opportunities for employment. It also tends to require a lot of travel, which is not something I am interested in doing in the future as a wife and mother. My dad traveled a lot when I was little for his job (he was one of the top computer systems analysts at the VA) and it put a lot of stress on my mom... I wouldn't be able to put that kind of stress on my family.

Kestrel - I don't know the names of all my Breyer horses, but I can tell you that I had enough of them to make a stampede that started on one end of my living room and stretched all the way to the other!
"The hardest arithmetic to master is that which enables us to count our blessings." - Eric Hoffer
 
RottieWoman
Posted on February 25 2010 07:35 PM
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Hi Kestrel Smile
Midnight Sun I don't know, think I had Man O War, had an Appy, and had several families, and also a pegasus and a unicorn.

Regardless of future possibilities, Kat, am happy for you that you are finding the class so fascinating Smile
 
justfoundout
Posted on March 12 2010 07:04 PM
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3/12/10
Okay, this isn't a book. My eyes are tired from all the schoolwork. But, at my local public library, I picked up a set of CD's, read by the authors,... 14 and 1/2 hours of them, on 12 CD's. Can I count this as a 'book' that I'm 'reading'?

It's entertaining, and yet comforting. The title is Animal, Vegetable, Miracle,... A Year of Food Life by Barbara Kingsolver with Steven L. Hopp and Camille Kingsolver. The back cover says, "Part memoir, part journalistic investigation, Animal, Vegetable, Miracle makes a passionate case for putting the kitchen back at the center of family life, and diversified farms at the center of the American diet." I've listened to the first CD, and I highly recommend this 'book'. - jus'
 
HouseMDfan110
Posted on March 14 2010 04:47 AM
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Hello all!

Don't think that I abandoned you, cause that's not the case. The start of this year has been rather chaotic, but I won't go into details. I hope you're all well, wherever you are in the world! Smile

I think Sir Arthur Conan Doyle is a genius, for Sherlock Holmes is what I am reading! Very, very clever.
 
justfoundout
Posted on March 14 2010 06:26 AM
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3/14/10
Dear HouseMDfan110,
You like to read Sherlock Holmes? That sounds like such a noble choice. I've only watched the old movies. - jus'
 
HouseMDfan110
Posted on March 14 2010 10:19 AM
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Yeah, I like it. It's fantastic. It's very enthralling.
I have not yet seen the movie(s), but I did see the trailer for the latest one with Robert Downey Jr. It looks good. How many films are there, roughly?
I don't know why, but there's something about old literature whether it be fiction or non- fiction, which is quite captivating...

HouseMDfan110
 
FeatherQuill
Posted on March 16 2010 12:41 PM
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The Great Gatsby, we're studying it at school and I've already read ahead Grin and I'm quite in love with it to a degree.

The other book is the Curious Incident of the dog in the night time told from the view of a boy with aspergers syndrome. But mainly I'm not to keen on it because it not the sort of humour I like, though it is easy reading.
 
CheshireKat
Posted on March 16 2010 01:36 PM
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FeatherQuill, I'm glad you're enjoying The Great Gatsby. I read that book in high school and absolutely hated it, so I'm glad somebody is enjoying it! I think I might like it now if I went back and read it again, maybe I will one day when I have free time. (Although I'm starting to seriously question if I will ever have any free time ever again.)

I am up to my ears in textbook reading, and primary source reading, and reading for my labs. I cannot wait for this semester to be over. Unfortunately when this semester is over, it means I get a few weeks off before I have to jump right into a summer session of combined Pre-Calc Algebra and Trig. Yes, COMBINED, because I was informed out of the blue by my academic adviser that I am now so far behind on my math tracking that this is the only way they will let me stay in the Psych degree program. Otherwise they will kick me back to my minor, Anthropology. Needless to say I am pissed at my school for not informing me of this sooner.
"The hardest arithmetic to master is that which enables us to count our blessings." - Eric Hoffer
 
justfoundout
Posted on March 16 2010 10:18 PM
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3/16/10
I've never read the Great Gadsby, but I saw the movie when it first came out, probably before most of you were born. It was a disappointment to me, mostly because (forgive me) the lead actress just wasn't (in my opinion) pretty enough to 'pull off' the lead role.

Kat, you've got more fortitude than I do, as besides wanting the semester to be over, getting an A in Biology has 'already sailed' off toward the horizon, and I'm not even swimming hard in pursuit of it. All I did was console myself that, at the two-year level, even a D is passing. This is very out-of-character for me, and, I fear, is attributable to 'burn out'. I've even got the best Biology teacher in the world, so this is something that's 'just me'.

I sincerely hope that you'll be able to stay in the psychology program, as people who are able to attain that title are few and far between, and dyscalculics who become psychologists must be scarcer than hen's teeth,... which would actually be 'zero', so there goes my dyscalculia popping off again. - jus'
 
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